Dr. Marina Chugunova

Senior Research Fellow

Innovation and Entrepreneurship Research

+49 89 24246-443
marina.chugunova(at)ip.mpg.de

Areas of Interest:

Behavioral and Experimental Economics, Digitalization, Human-Machine Interaction, Social Norms, Redistribution and Inequality

Academic Résumé

10/2018 – present
Senior Research Fellow at the Max Planck Institute for Innovation and Competition (Innovation and Entrepreneurship Research)

Affiliate, Collaborative Research Center Transregio "Rationality and Competition", B04

03/2015 – 10/2018
Ph.D. in Economics, University of Hamburg, Germany, Graduate School of Economics and Social Sciences
Doctoral Thesis: “Institutional Consequences of Justice on Cooperation and Redistribution Systems”

03/2015 – 08/2018
Research Associate, DFG FOR 2104 “Needs-Based Justice and Distribution Procedures”, D1

11/2017 – 06/2018
Visiting Ph.D. Student, University of Zurich, Switzerland

10/2017
Visiting Ph.D. Student, CNRS – GATE, Lyon, France

03/2017 – 07/2017
Visiting Ph.D. Student, University of Zurich, Switzerland

10/2012 – 02/2015
M.Sc. Politics, Economics and Philosophy, School of Business, Economics and Social Sciences, University of Hamburg, Germany

09/2008 – 07/2012
B.A. in Political Science (Hons), Moscow State Institute of International Relations (MGIMO University), Moscow, Russia

10/2011 – 03/2012
Exchange Semester, Dresden University of Technology, Faculty of International Relations, Dresden, Germany

Honors, Scholarships, Academic Prizes

2019
Research Grant of the Diligentia foundation for the project with E.Ranehill and A.Sandberg

Grant for organizing a Workshop on Entrepreneurship and Innovation by the CRC TRR190 with M.Kleine and S.Schudy

2018
Travel Grant of the Rievers foundation

2017
Research Grant Graduate School of University of Hamburg

Best Paper Award “When to Leave Carrots for Sticks: On the Evolution of Sanctioning Institutions in Open Communities” at the 10th RGS Doctoral Conference in Economics, University of Dortmund, Germany

2015 – 2016
Merit Scholarship of the University of Hamburg and DAAD

2013 – 2014
Merit Scholarship of the University of Hamburg and DAAD

2011 – 2012
Merit Scholarship of the Government of the Russian Federation

Publications

Articles in Refereed Journals

Chugunova, Marina; Nicklisch, Andreas; Schnapp, Kai-Uwe (2022). Redistribution and Production with a Subsistence Income Constraint: A Real-Effort Experiment, FinanzArchiv - Public Finance Analysis, 78 (1/2), 208-238. DOI

  • A large body of experimental studies demonstrates that redistribution leads to inefficiencies due to distorted work incentives. Yet, this finding is typically obtained in environments where people are unconstrained in their labor-leisure allocation decisions. In this paper we study labor supply decisions in a framework with a subsistence income constraint and a redistribution system that supports disadvantaged members of a society in meeting the constraint. We document that while high-talent taxpayers perform equally well in all conditions, the less talented ones significantly decrease their performance in response to the introduction of the tax. The negative effect of taxation is mitigated if an income threshold is present and the tax is spent meaningfully.
  • Also published as: Working paper // DFG Research Group 2104 ; No. 2017,18

Chugunova, Marina; Sele, Daniela (2022). We and It: An Interdisciplinary Review of the Experimental Evidence on How Humans Interact with Machines, Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics 99. DOI

  • Today, humans interact with automation frequently and in a variety of settings ranging from private to professional. Their behavior in these interactions has attracted considerable research interest across several fields, with sometimes little exchange among them and seemingly inconsistent findings. In this article, we review 138 experimental studies on how people interact with automated agents, that can assume different roles. We synthesize the evidence, suggest ways to reconcile inconsistencies between studies and disciplines, and discuss organizational and societal implications. The reviewed studies show that people react to automated agents differently than they do to humans: In general, they behave more rationally, and seem less prone to emotional and social responses, though this may be mediated by the agents’ design. Task context, performance expectations and the distribution of decision authority between humans and automated agents are all factors that systematically impact the willingness to accept automated agents in decision-making - that is, humans seem willing to (over-)rely on algorithmic support, yet averse to fully ceding their decision authority. The impact of these behavioral regularities for the deliberation of the benefits and risks of automation in organizations and society is discussed.
  • Also published as: Max Planck Institute for Innovation & Competition Research Paper No. 20-15
  • Also published as: ETH Zurich Center for Law and Economics Working Paper Series No. 12/2020

Chugunova, Marina; Luhan, Wolfgang; Nicklisch, Andreas (2020). When to Leave Carrots for Sticks: On the Evolution of Sanctioning Institutions in Open Communities, Economics Letters 191. DOI

  • When asked, people dislike punishment institutions, although punishment is more effective than rewards to maintain cooperation in social dilemmas. Which institution do they choose in the long run? We study migration patterns in a laboratory experiment that allows participants to migrate continuously between punishment and reward communities. The majority of participants initially chooses the reward institution, but a substantial number of subjects joins the less profitable punishment community subsequently. In this case, the mere threat of punishment establishes high contributions. Income differences and missing compensations for cooperators in the reward community are the key factors for the decision to migrate.

Contributions to Collected Editions

Bechthold, Laura; Chugunova, Marina; Friess, Svenja; Hoisl, Karin; Rose, Michael (2021). Women in Creative Labor: Inventors, Entrepreneurs and Academics, in: Ulla Weber (ed.), Fundamental Questions. Gender Dimensions in Max Planck Research Projects (Schriften zur Gleichstellung, 51), 135-154. Baden-Baden: Nomos. DOI

    Discussion Papers

    Chugunova, Marina; Luhan, Wolfgang J. (2022). Ruled by Robots: Preference for Algorithmic Decision Makers and Perceptions of Their Choices, Max Planck Institute for Innovation & Competition Research Paper, No. 22-04.

    • As technology-assisted decision-making is becoming more widespread, it is important to understand how the algorithmic nature of the decision-maker affects how decisions are perceived by the affected people. We use a laboratory experiment to study the preference for human or algorithmic decision makers in re-distributive decisions. In particular, we consider whether algorithmic decision maker will be preferred because of its unbiasedness. Contrary to previous findings, the majority of participants (over 60%) prefer the algorithm as a decision maker over a human—but this is not driven by concerns over biased decisions. Yet, despite this preference, the decisions made by humans are regarded more favorably. Participants judge the decisions to be equally fair, but are nonetheless less satisfied with the AI decisions. Subjective ratings of the decisions are mainly driven by own material interests and fairness ideals. For the latter, players display remarkable flexibility: they tolerate any explainable deviation between the actual decision and their ideals, but react very strongly and negatively to redistribution decisions that do not fit any fairness ideals. Our results suggest that even in the realm of moral decisions algorithmic decision-makers might be preferred, but actual performance of the algorithm plays an important role in how the decisions are rated.
    • Available at SSRN

    Chugunova, Marina; Danilov, Anastasia (2022). Use of Digital Technologies for HR Management in Germany: Survey Evidence, Max Planck Institute for Innovation & Competition Research Paper, No. 22-02.

    • Using a survey with 57 German firms, we evaluate the level of digitalization of the HR management function and document perceived benefits and barriers of technology adoption from organizational and individual users’ perspectives. The results give a reason for optimism. Most of the companies report that the core HR processes are digitized. We do not observe adverse effects of the digital HRM tools on users’ job satisfaction and work stress. Still, more than half of companies do not yet use digital tools for strategic HRM decisions. Respondents appreciate the increased speed and cost-efficiency of digital HRM processes and associate it with a competitive advantage in talent acquisition. The most prominent adoption barriers are lack of qualified professionals, high costs, and uncertainty regarding the legal framework. Moreover, we test if small and medium-sized enterprises differ systematically from larger organizations in how they use digital HRM tools.
    • Available at SSRN

    Chugunova, Marina; Juanmarti, Arnau; Keller, Klaus; Samila, Sampsa (2021). Robots, China and Polls: Structural Shocks and Political Participation in the US, Max Planck Institute for Innovation & Competition Research Paper, No. 21-22. DOI

    • What is the effect of labour market adjustment to automation on political participation? We study the consequences of the introduction of industrial robots across US commuting zones on voter turnout in US counties between 2000 and 2016. We first replicate prior results showing negative effects of exposure to robots on employment and household incomes at local labour markets and then show that an increase in the exposure by one robot per thousand workers leads to a 0.64 percentage point lower voter turnout at US presidential elections. We contrast this result with the effect of the exposure to Chinese imports, for which we do not find a negative effect on political participation. Using individual level data we document that people at risk of automation are 15% percent more likely to abstain. To understand why the effect is not uniform, we conduct an online survey experiment. We find that the nature of the shock matters beyond the mere economic consequences. While the government is seen as instrumental in addressing the trade shock, it is perceived less effective in the case of automation. Our finding highlight an important behavioral aspect of the political economy of technological change.

    Chugunova, Marina; Sele, Daniela (2020). We and It: An Interdisciplinary Review of the Experimental Evidence on Human-Machine Interaction, Max Planck Institute for Innovation & Competition Research Paper, No. 20-15.

    • Today, humans interact with technology frequently and in a variety of settings. Their behavior in these interactions has attracted considerable research interest across several fields, with sometimes little exchange among them and seemingly inconsistent findings. Here, we review over 110 experimental studies on human-machine interaction. We synthesize the evidence from different disciplines, suggest ways to reconcile inconsistencies, and elaborate on political and societal implications. The reviewed studies show that people react to automated agents differently than to humans: They behave more rationally, and are less prone to emotional and social responses. We show that there are several factors which systematically impact the willingness to accept automated decisions: task context, performance expectations and the distribution of decision authority. That is, humans seem willing to (over-)rely on algorithmic support, yet averse to fully ceding their decision authority. These behavioral regularities need to be considered when deliberating the benefits and risks of automation.
    • Available at SSRN
    • Also published in: Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics, Volume 99, August 2022, 101897

    Chugunova, Marina; Nicklisch, Andreas; Schnapp, Kai-Uwe (2017). On the Effects of Transparency and Reciprocity on Labor Supply in the Redistribution Systems, Working Paper / DFG-Research Group 2104, Nr. 2017-19.

    • Although taxation distorts work incentives both for taxpayers and transfer recipients, its net effect on labor provision is shown to be less severe than predicted by the theory. It is likely that the reciprocity between taxpayers and transfer recipients plays an important role in
      mitigating the negative consequences of redistribution and maintaining a high level of effort. To check it we run a series of real-effort experiments exploring the production effects of taxation in the environment with unilateral monitoring: Taxpayers can continuously monitor the effort of the transfer recipient, which is designed to trigger reciprocity.
      Surprisingly, we find that monitoring decreases the total labor provision: recipients produce significantly less under monitoring, while the
      production of the taxpayers remains unchanged.
    • https://epub.sub.uni-hamburg.de/epub/volltexte/2020/100489/pdf/2017_19.pdf

    Chugunova, Marina; Nicklisch, Andreas; Schnapp, Kai-Uwe (2017). Redistribution and Production with the Subsistence Income Constraint: a Real-Effort Experiment, Working Paper / DFG-Research Group 2104, Nr. 2017-18.

    • A large body of literature demonstrates that redistribution leads to inefficiencies due to distorted work incentives. Yet, this result is obtained under the assumption that people are absolutely free in their labor-leisure allocation decisions and that taxation is merely a wage cut. We challenge this assumption and study labor supply decisions
      in a framework with the subsistence income constraint and a redistribution system which supports disadvantaged players. The results of the real-effort experiment show that the introduction of the moderate
      subsistence income requirement causes a substantial increase in productivity among taxpayers, with slight additional boost if tax returns are transferred to recipients and not wasted unproductively. As for
      recipients, the prospect of receiving a transfer significantly enhances
      their productivity and spurs the overall efficiency leading to a self-sorting of recipients according to their skills.
    • http://epub.sub.uni-hamburg.de/epub/volltexte/2020/100471/
    • Published in: FinanzArchiv Jahrgang 78 (2022) / Heft 1-2, S. 208-238 (31)

    Seminar and Conference Presentations

    29.11.2021
    Sexual Misconduct Allegations: Do You Separate the Researcher from His Research?
    LMU Innovation Workshop
    Location: online


    26.11.2021
    Sexual Misconduct Allegations: Do You Separate the Researcher from His Research?
    Behavioral and Experimental Seminar , University of Gothenburg
    Location: online


    28.08.2021
    Automation, Trade and Political Participation: Evidence from US Local Labour Markets
    EARIE
    Location: online


    10.06.2021
    Sexual Misconduct Allegations: Do You Separate the Researcher from His Research?
    Brown Bag Seminar, Erasmus University Rotterdam
    Location: online


    26.05.2021
    Sexual Misconduct Allegations: Do You Separate the Researcher from His Research?
    University of Portsmouth
    Location: online


    02. - 05.03.2020
    Survey: Use of AI in Households
    Research Seminar
    Location: Zugspitze


    13.12.2019
    Should a Robot be King? On Acceptance of AI Decisions
    Workshop on Entrepreneurship and Innovation
    Location: Munich


    22.11.2019
    Digital and Human
    Minerva Fast Track Fellowship Selection Process
    Location: Berlin


    06.09.2019
    Should the Robot be King? On Acceptance of Algorithmic Decisions
    ESA European Meeting
    Location: Dijon, France


    06.07.2019
    Is Time on Our Side? On the Benefits on Committing to Charities
    ESA World Meeting
    Location: Vancouver, Canada


    10.04.2019
    When to Leave Carrots for Sticks: On the Evolution of Sanctioning Institutions in Open Communities
    CRC TRR190
    Location: Berlin


    22.11.2018
    Safetynets and Entrepreneurship
    DFG FOR2104 Workshop, University of Bremen
    Location: Bremen


    28.08.2018
    When to Leave Carrots for Sticks: On the Evolution of Sanctioning Institutions in Open Communities
    European Economic Association
    Location: Cologne


    23.08.2018
    Is Time on Our Side? On the Benefits on Committing to Charities
    Behavioral Economics, Norwegian School of Economics
    Location: Bergen, Norway


    29.06.2018
    Is Time on Our Side? On the Benefits on Committing to Charities
    Economic Science Association World Meeting
    Location: Berlin


    14.06.2018
    When to Leave Carrots for Sticks: On the Evolution of Sanctioning Institutions in Open Communities
    Doctoral Seminar, University of Hamburg
    Location: Hamburg


    06.03.2018
    Is Time on Our Side? On the Benefits of Committing to Charities
    6th Spring School in Behavioral Economics by the Norwegian School of Economics and the Rady School of Management, UC San Diego
    Location: San Diego, US


    01.03.2018
    When to Leave Carrots for Sticks: On the Evolution of Sanctioning Institutions in Open Communities
    DFG Conference FOR2104, University of Vienna
    Location: Vienna, Austria

    Attended Seminars and Workshops

    06.-08.12.2021
    4th Research on Innovation, Science and Entrepreneurship Workshop (RISE4)
    Location: online


    19.-20.11.2021
    CESifo Area Conference on Economics of Digitization
    Location: online


    17.11.2021
    MÜNCHNER KREIS: Human-Machine-Interaction
    Location: online


    29.-30.10.2021
    CESifo Area Conference on Behavioural Economics
    Location: online


    11.-13.09.2021
    Retreat of CRC TRR 190, Collaborative Research Center Rationality and Competition
    Location: online


    27.-28.08.2021
    EARIE Annual Conference
    Location: online


    09.-11.06.2021
    Economics of Creative Destruction Conference – A Festschrift Symposium
    Location: online


    23.-24.03.2021
    The NEXUS:ISRAEL Dealmakers Summit
    Location: online


    26.02.2021
    Workshop on Field Experiments in Strategy, Innovation and Entrepreneurship
    Location: online


    17.-18.12.2020
    3rd Research on Innovation, Science and Entrepreneurship Workshop (RISE3)
    Location: online


    16.-19.12.2020
    Workshop on Information Systems and Economics
    Location: online


    22.-23.10.2020
    CESifo Area Conference on Behavioural Economics
    Location: online (CESifo, Munich)


    01.-02.10.2020
    Workshop CRC Retreat
    Location: online


    19.-20.12.2019
    Workshop on Information Systems and Economics
    Location: LMU, Munich


    16.-17.12.2019
    2nd Research on Innovation, Science and Entrepreneurship Workshop (RISE2)
    Location: Munich


    12.-13.12.2019
    Workshop on Entrepreneurship and Innovation
    Location: Munich

    25.-26.10.2019
    CESifo Area Conference on Behavioural Economics
    Location: CESifo, Munich


    09.-12.09.2019
    Behavioral Economics, NHH, FAIR
    Location: Norway School of Economics, Bergen, Norway


    17.-19.07.2019
    Munich Summer Institute
    Location: Bavarian Academy of Sciences and Humanities, Munich


    14.-16.07.2019
    Natural Experiments and Controlled Field Studies
    Location: Ohlstadt


    20.-23.08.2018
    Behavioral Economics, FAIR
    Location: Norway School of Economics, Bergen, Norway


    02.-06.07.2018
    Summer School in Law & Economics 2018
    Location: University of Hamburg


    04.-06.06.2018
    Munich Summer Institute 2018
    Location: Bavarian Academy of Sciences and Humanities, Munich


    02.-06.07.2018
    6th Spring School in Behavioral Economcs by NHH and Rady School of Management
    Location: UC San Diego, US


    24.-25.10.2017
    2nd Social and Moral Norms Workshop
    Location: CNRS-LAB, Lyon, France


    24.-25.03.2017
    Zurich Workshop on Applied Behavioral Theory
    Location: University of Zurich, Switzerland


    08.2016
    4th Summer School on Decisions From Experience
    Location: Warwick Business School, University of Warwick, Coventry, United Kingdom

    Projects