Michael E. Rose, Ph.D.

Senior Research Fellow

Innovation and Entrepreneurship Research

+49 89 24246-566
michael.rose(at)ip.mpg.de

Personal Website:

http://michael-e-ro.se

Areas of Interest:

Economics of Science, Innovation, Academic Labor Market, Social Network Analysis, Machine Learning

Academic Résumé

Since 06/2018
Post-Doctoral Researcher at the Max Planck Institute for Innovation and Competition (Innovation and Entrepreneurship Research)

03/2018 – 05/2018
Guest Researcher at Deutsche Bundesbank, Research Centre

08/2017 – 02/2018
Visiting Researcher an Georgia Institute of Technology, Scheller College of Business

04/2015 – 08/2018
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) at University of Cape Town;Doctoral Thesis: “Collaboration Networks in Economic Science”

10/2014 – 05/2015
Advanced Studies Program in International Economic Policy Research at Kiel Institute for the World Economy

10/2012 – 09/2014
Master of Science (M.Sc.) in Quantitative Economics, Kiel University; Erasmus Exchange Semester at Stockholm University

10/2009 – 09/2012
Bachelor of Science (B.Sc.) in Economics and Business Administration at University of Jena; Exchange semester at Stellenbosch University

Scholarships

2017 - 2018
University of Cape Town Murray-Jelks Scholarship for International Travel

2015 - 2018
AIFMRM PhD Dissertation Scholarship

Conference Visits

2019
2nd EAYE workshop on Social Networks (Paris)
Verein für Socialpolitik Annual Conference 2019 (Leipzig)
31st European Association of Labour Economists Conference (Uppsala)
Scopus-Anwendertreffen (Hanover)
72nd European Meeting of the Econometric Society (Manchester)
34th Annual Congress of the European Economic Association (Manchester)
2019 Academy of Management Annual Meeting (Boston)
2019 Spring Meeting of Young Economists, ULB (Brussels)
BRICK 2019: The Organisation, Economics and Policy of Scientific Research, Bordeaux University (Bordeaux)

2018
“Innovation, Economic Complexity and Economic Geography Workshop”, MIT Media Lab & INET-MSI (Cambridge, MA)
“7th Annual Workshop on Networks in Economics and Finance”, IMT School for Advanced Studies (Lucca)

2017
Southern African Finance Association Meeting (Cape Town)
“Economics of Scientific Research“, Erasmus University (Rotterdam)
17th Annual REER Conference, Georgia Institute of Technology, Scheller College of Business (Atlanta, GA)

2016
“International Symposium on Science of Science”, Library of Congress (Washington, DC)
2016 Africa Meeting of the Econometric Society (Kruger Park, South Africa)

2015
IfW/ZBW Conference “The Future of Scholary Communication” (Hamburg)
Biennial Conference of the Economic Society of South Africa (Cape Town)
3rdERSA Economic Theory Workshop (Cape Town)
“Networks, Complexity and Economic Development”, Hungarian Academy of Sciences (Budapest)

Publications

Articles in Refereed Journals

Hottenrott, Hanna; Rose, Michael; Lawson, Cornelia (2021). The Rise of Multiple Institutional Affiliations in Academia, Journal of the Association for Information Science and Technology, 72 (8), 1039-1058. DOI

  • This study provides the first systematic, international, large-scale evidence on the extent and nature of multiple institutional affiliations on journal publications. Studying more than 15 million authors and 22 million articles from 40 countries we document that: In 2019, almost one in three articles was (co-)authored by authors with multiple affiliations and the share of authors with multiple affiliations increased from around 10% to 16% since 1996. The growth of multiple affiliations is prevalent in all fields and it is stronger in high impact journals. About 60% of multiple affiliations are between institutions from within the academic sector. International co-affiliations, which account for about a quarter of multiple affiliations, most often involve institutions from the United States, China, Germany and the United Kingdom, suggesting a core-periphery network. Network analysis also reveals a number communities of countries that are more likely to share affiliations. We discuss potential causes and show that the timing of the rise in multiple affiliations can be linked to the introduction of more competitive funding structures such as "excellence initiatives" in a number of countries. We discuss implications for science and science policy.
  • Also published as: Max Planck Institute for Innovation & Competition Research Paper No. 20-14
  • Also published as arXiv Preprint

Rose, Michael; George, Co-Pierre (2021). What 5,000 Acknowledgements Tell Us About Informal Collaboration in Financial Economics, Research Policy, 50 (6). DOI

  • We present and discuss a novel dataset on informal collaboration in financial economics, manually collected from more than 5,000 acknowledgement sections of published papers. We find that informal collaboration is the norm in financial economics, while generational differences in informal collaboration exist and reciprocity among collaborators prevails. Female researchers appear less often in acknowledgements than comparable male researchers. Information derived from networks of informal collaboration allows us to predict academic impact of both researchers and papers even better than information from co-author networks. Finally, we study the characteristics of the networks using various measures from network theory and characterize what determines a researcher’s position in it. The data presented here may help other researchers to shed light on an under-explored topic.
  • Also published as: Max Planck Institute for Innovation & Competition Discussion Paper No. 11

Rose, Michael; Kitchin, John R. (2019). pybliometrics: Scriptable Bibliometrics Using a Python Interface to Scopus, SoftwareX, 10. DOI

  • We present a wrapper for the Scopus RESTful API written for Python 3. The wrapper allows users to access the Scopus database via user-friendly interfaces and can be used without prior knowledge of RESTful APIs. The package provides classes to interact with different Scopus APIs to retrieve information as diverse as citation counts, author information or document abstracts. Files are cached to speed up subsequent analysis. The package addresses all users of Scopus data, such as researchers working in Science of Science or evaluators. It facilitates reproducibility of research projects and enhances data integrity for researchers using Scopus data.
  • Also published as: Max Planck Institute for Innovation & Competition Research Paper No. 19-03

Contributions to Collected Editions

Bechthold, Laura; Chugunova, Marina; Friess, Svenja; Hoisl, Karin; Rose, Michael (2021). Women in Creative Labor: Inventors, Entrepreneurs and Academics, in: Ulla Weber (ed.), Fundamental Questions. Gender Dimensions in Max Planck Research Projects (Schriften zur Gleichstellung, 51), 135-154. Baden-Baden: Nomos. DOI

    Discussion Papers

    Rose, Michael (2020). Small World: Narrow, Wide and Long replication of Goyal, van der Leij and Moraga-González (JPE 2006) and a Comparison of EconLit and Scopus, Max Planck Institute for Innovation & Competition Research Paper, No. 21-01. DOI

    • I undertake a narrow, wide and long replication of Goyal, van der Leij and Moraga-González (Journal of Political Economy 2006; 114(2): 403–412). Using social network analysis they show that the Economics profession gradually evolved into a small world. Small worlds (or small world networks) have unique information transmission capabilities. The trend is explained by the emergence of frequently publishing researchers with many distinct co-authors. In a social network they resemble stars. The original results are robust to the usage of (I) another software, (II) a recent version of the originally used data, and (III) another database and a more sophisticated author disambiguation.
    • Available at SSRN

    Rose, Michael; Baruffaldi, Stefano Horst (2020). Finding Doppelgängers in Scopus: How to Build Scientists Control Groups Using Sosia, Max Planck Institute for Innovation & Competition Research Paper, No. 20-20. DOI

    • The construction of control groups of scientists is often a daunting effort. This paper presents sosia, an open-source Python-based software designed to query efficiently the Scopus database via RESTful API. sosia searches for researchers with publication profiles similar to a given researcher up to a given year based on all main standard bibliometric indicators. The user can choose flexibly a set of parameters to restrict the search to more or less narrow boundaries upfront and obtain additional similarity indicators to select a subset of authors after the search. Advanced settings also allow to narrow the search to a list of affiliations and to minimize the possible errors arising from ambiguous author profiles. One basic search can be set up in a few command lines and the average time of computation goes between 60 and 300 minutes. We discuss the functioning, characteristics, limitations and possible extension of the software.

    Rose, Michael; George, Co-Pierre; Opolot, Daniel C. (2020). Discussants, Max Planck Institute for Innovation & Competition Research Paper, No. 20-19.

    • We study the role of informal collaboration in academic knowledge production. Our focus is on published papers presented at similar workshops at the NBER Summer Institutes. Though not random, our setting is conducive to studying the role of informal collaboration in academic knowledge production. Papers are of comparable quality and the workshops are otherwise similar. Even among a set of papers that is highly selected on expected quality, discussants matter for top journal publication. Conditional on having a discussant, a paper’s citation count increases in the discussant’s prolificness. Our findings support the existence of quality-improving channels through which discussants improve the inherent quality of a paper. Conversely, using social network analysis we rule out a diffusion channel through which citations accumulate because discussants diffuse information about the paper within their social network.
    • Available at SSRN

    Hottenrott, Hanna; Rose, Michael; Lawson, Cornelia (2019). The Rise of Multiple Institutional Affiliations, arXiv preprint 1912.05576.

    • The affiliation to an institution provides prestige and identity to researchers and determines access to resources and infrastructure. Institutions in turn seek to affiliate researchers to secure their knowledge and skills, benefiting the research conducted within these institutions and their position in national and international rankings. This study documents the phenomenon of researchers having multiple affiliations and discusses potential causes and consequences. We analyze affiliation information of 8.5M authors from 40 countries, who published 8.9M scientific articles in 14 disciplines since 1996. We find that multiple affiliations occur both within countries as well as across borders, and that more than 60% are within the academic research sector. The share of authors with multiple affiliations increased substantially over the past two decades and particularly since the mid-2000s. The increase is particularly pronounced in countries whose funding structures became more competitive. The rise of multiple affiliations points to fundamental changes in the organisation of science and challenges our measurements of where scientific activity takes place.
    • Also published as: Max Planck Institute for Innovation & Competition Research Paper No. 20-14

    Rose, Michael; Kitchin, John R. (2019). pybliometrics: Scriptable Bibliometrics Using a Python Interface to Scopus, Max Planck Institute for Innovation & Competition Research Paper, No. 19-03.

    • We present a wrapper for the Scopus RESTful API written for Python 3. The wrapper allows users to access the Scopus database via user-friendly interfaces and can be used without prior knowledge of RESTful APIs. The package provides classes to interact with different Scopus APIs to retrieve information as diverse as citation counts, author information or document abstracts. Files are cached to speed up subsequent analysis. The package addresses all users of Scopus data, such as researchers working in Science of Science or evaluators. It facilitates re- producibility of research projects and enhances data integrity for researchers using Scopus data.
    • Available at SSRN
    • Also published in SoftwareX, 10, 100263

    Rose, Michael; Shekhar, Suraj (2018). Indirect Contacts in Hiring: The Economics Job Market, Max Planck Institute for Innovation & Competition Research Paper, No. 18-12.

    • Using two identification strategies, we demonstrate a positive relationship between the connectedness of a PhD adviser (in the coauthor network) and the placement of her student. In method one, identification is achieved by using changes in the centrality of the adviser’s coauthors in the year of student placement as an exogenous shock to the adviser’s centrality. Our second strategy uses the death of faculty members as an exogenous shock to show that the probability of a student being placed at a particular university reduces when the ‘social distance’ between her adviser and that university increases due to the death.
    • Available at SSRN

    Georg, Co-Pierre; Rose, Michael; Opolot, Daniel (2017). Informal Intellectual Collaboration with Central Colleagues, Kiel Working Paper, 2084.

    • When preparing a research article, academics engage in informal intellectual collaboration by asking their colleagues for feedback. This collaboration gives rise to a social network between academics. We study whether informal intellectual collaboration with an academic who is more central in this social network results in a research article having higher scientific impact. To address the well-known reflection problem in estimating network effects, we use the assignment of discussants at NBER summer institutes as a quasi-natural experiment. We show that manuscripts discussed by a discussant with a 10% higher than average Bonacich centrality rank results in 1.4% more citations and a 5% higher probability that an article is published in a top journal. To illustrate our results, we develop a structural model in which a positive externality from intellectual collaboration implies that collaborating with a more central colleague results in larger scientific impact of the research article.
    • https://www.ifw-kiel.de/fileadmin/Dateiverwaltung/IfW-Publications/system/informal-intellectual-collaboration-with-central-colleagues/kwp_2084.pdf

    Presentations

    29.09.2020
    Discussants
    KU Leuven, Leuven, Netherlands
    Location: online


    09.2020
    Progress on All Fronts – Updates on Current Projects
    Research Seminar
    Location: online (Munich)


    21.08.2020
    Discussants
    Kiel Institute for the World Economy
    Location: Kiel


    03.2020
    Updates and Discussants
    Research Seminar
    Location: Zugspitze

    Lectures

    17/08/2020 – 20/08/2020
    Machine Learning for Economists
    Kiel Institute for the World Economy
    Location: Kiel


    03/2018
    Big Data and Machine Learning for Python
    ifo-Institut
    Location: Munich


    04/2018
    Big Data and Machine Learning for Python
    LMU Munich
    Location: Munich


    01/2018
    Machine Learning for Python
    Georgia Institute of Technology (Scheller College of Business)
    Location: Atlanta (Georgia), US


    09/2017
    Data Acquisition for Python
    Georgia Institute of Technology, Scheller College of Business
    Location: Atlanta (Georgia), US


    04/2017 - 06/2017
    Risk Management Computing Skills
    Master's Course, University of Cape Town
    Location: Cape Town, South Africa


    03/2017
    Computational Mathematics
    Teaching Assistant, Master's Pre-course, University of Cape Town
    Location: Cape Town, South Africa


    02/2016 - 12/2016
    Quantitative Methods in Economics and Financial Econometrics
    Teaching Assistant, Master's Course, University of Cape Town
    Location: Cape Town, South Africa

    Projects