Seminar  |  03/17/2021 | 3:00 p.m.  –  4:15 p.m.

Innovation & Entrepreneurship Seminar: Flow of Ideas: Economic Societies and the Rise of Useful Knowledge

Erik Hornung (University of Cologne)

Seminars currently take place in online format (see seminar page).

In this paper, we argue that economic societies, established during the eighteenth-century, contributed to industrialization through the diffusion of new ideas generated during the Scientific Revolution in Europe. Local societies functioned as catalyst for the translation of scientific knowledge into useful knowledge and the diffusion to interested parties. We test this hypothesis by combining information on more than 3,300 society members from the membership lists of all active economic societies in the German lands with several measures of innovation and upper-tail human capital. We find a robust positive relationship between the local member density and the number of valuable patents, exhibitors at world fairs, and highly-skilled mechanical workers. We further show that grid-cell pairs with members from the same society show a higher technological similarity. We interpret this as evidence that economic societies generated information networks which fostered spatial knowledge diffusion and shaped the geography of innovation.


Contact: David Heller

Seminar  |  03/31/2021 | 3:00 p.m.  –  4:15 p.m.

Innovation & Entrepreneurship Seminar: Mapping Markush Patents

Stefan Wagner (ESMT Berlin)


Seminars currently take place in online format (see seminar page).

Abstract follows soon.


Contact: Marina Chugunova

Seminar  |  05/12/2021 | 5:00 p.m.  –  6:15 p.m.

Innovation & Entrepreneurship Seminar: Valuing the Vaccine

Lisa Larrimore Ouellette (Stanford Law School)


Seminars currently take place in online format (see seminar page).

Abstract follows soon.


Contact Person: Lucy Xiaolu Wang

Seminar  |  05/12/2021 | 5:00 p.m.  –  6:15 p.m.

Innovation & Entrepreneurship Seminar: Individual Consequences of Occupational Decline

Georg Graetz (Uppsala University)


Seminars currently take place in online format (see seminar page).

How much lower are the career earnings of workers who face large declines in demand for their occupations, compared to similar workers who do not? To answer this question we combine forecasts on occupational employment changes, measures of realized occupational decline and technological replacement, and administrative panel data on the population of Swedish workers, with a highly disaggregated initial occupational classification.  We find that compared to similar workers, those facing occupational decline lost about 2-5 percent of mean cumulative earnings from 1986-2013, with workers at the bottom of their occupation’s initial earnings distribution suffering substantially larger losses.  These earnings losses are partly accounted for by reduced employment and increased time spent in unemployment and retraining.


Contact Person: Michael E. Rose

Seminar  |  05/19/2021, 3:00 p.m.  –  05/16/2021, 4:15 p.m.

Preview: Innovation & Entrepreneurship Seminar mit Otto Toivanen (Aalto University)


Seminars currently take place in online format (see seminar page).

Contact: Rainer Widmann

Seminar  |  05/26/2021 | 2:00 p.m.  –  3:15 p.m.

Innovation & Entrepreneurship Seminar: Burying the Hatchet? How Competition Affects the Performance Benefits of Diversity

Giada Di Stefano (Bocconi University)


Seminars currently take place in online format (see seminar page).

Abstract follows soon.


Contact Person: Lucy Xiaolu Wang

Conference  |  06/07/2021, 9:00 a.m.  –  06/09/2021, 6:00 p.m.

Munich Summer Institute 2021

The Munich Summer Institute 2021 will take place from 7 to 9 June 2021. The call for papers will be released in late 2020. The program will be available in the spring of 2021. More information on the MSI website.

Workshop  |  06/09/2021, 9:30 a.m.  –  06/10/2021, 4:00 p.m.

IP Laws’ Game Changers? The Cases of IoT and AI Technologies

Max Planck Law Teaching Session with Begoña Gonzalez Otero
(Registration required)

Begona Gonzalez Otero
Begoña Gonzalez Otero

We are facing what some have described as a period of the most radical exponential change in human history. The overlapping emergence of new technologies, including the Internet of Things and Artificial Intelligence, point towards a disturbing scenario in which many of our well established certainties are broken into millions of pieces. Intellectual property is not immune to these challenges. As a tool to encourage innovation and competition in the marketplace, any intellectual property system should be aligned with the development of big-data, AI, and other hybridization technologies. But an intellectual property system also must contribute to sustainable development goals.


The course will examine in a holistic manner the impact emerging technologies and new hybrid technologies may have on intellectual property systems


9 June 2021
The first day will focus on the context of society and markets in which technological disruptions occur and will identify the main challenges of data-driven technologies to innovation and competition.


10 June 2021
The second day will look at the legal and policy challenges, rolling out the two cases (IoT and AI) across the IP landscape.


Participants are encouraged to think beforehand of one example about what they may consider an innovation in their field of expertise that has been motivated by the use of IoT or AI technologies.


In-person if possible or hybrid format.


Please register by 17.00 CET on 3 April 2021.


Webpage of Begoña Gonzalez Otero

Workshop  |  09/03/2021, 2:00 p.m.  –  09/04/2021, 1:30 p.m.

Intellectual Property Law-Making as Line (Re-)Drawing

Max Planck Law Teaching Session with Daria Kim
(Registration required)

Policy- and law-making in the field of intellectual property (IP) is essentially about drawing a line between non-excludable and excludable, free or subject to remuneration, use of results of human intellectual activity. The rationales for such boundaries stem from various theories about innovation, creativity, and social wellbeing.  The question of where to draw a line thus becomes a matter of balancing competing interests and policy objectives.Policy- and law-making in the field of intellectual property (IP) is essentially about drawing a line between non-excludable and excludable, free or subject to remuneration, use of results of human intellectual activity. The rationales for such boundaries stem from various theories about innovation, creativity, and social wellbeing.  The question of where to draw a line thus becomes a matter of balancing competing interests and policy objectives.


The workshop will explore the challenges of this exercise and illustrate them by initiatives of the European Commission in the field of EU IP law. It will stimulate participants to view IP law and policy as a “work in progress,” rather than being “cast in stone,” and to think critically about how IP frameworks might be improved.


3 September 2021 – 14.00 to 17:30

  • Theoretical foundations of IP law
  • Critical perspectives on IP


4 September 2021 – 10.00 to 13.30

  • IP policy levers
  • IP law from a law-in-social-context perspective


In-person if possible or hybrid format


Enrollment: Maximum 25 Participants


Please register by 17.00 CET on 3 July 2021.


Webpage of Daria Kim